Dialect in Dialogue by Jude Sierra

When I was writing my third novel, Idlewild, I spent a lot of time pondering (agonizing) over speech patterns in dialogue for my characters. This story takes place in downtown Detroit; in it we have Tyler, a young, genderqueer black man coming out of college and into adulthood who grew up in the city. We also have Asher, a sort-of middle aged (I am struggling to reconcile 33 as middle aged, if only so I can avoid being called so myself, ha!) Jewish man from the suburbs who has become…

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Men in Romance: M in a W M4M World by Edmond Manning

Men in Romance is a series of posts focusing on the various experiences and perspectives of men who write romance. Read more from this series here. I’ve been avoiding writing this guest blog post for weeks, though almost daily, I’ve been ruminating.  It takes a lot of effort to ruminate. Big Author Word. In some ways, this seems like a no-win topic. Whenever a gay man discusses being a writer in a woman-dominated genre, discussion often intensifies into a “who belongs here” argument. Let’s skip to its resolution: women belong…

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The hottest sparkliest most id-tastic version of the thing by CS Pacat

Recently I’ve been thinking a lot about moe, the Japanese word for the feeling of excitement, love or fannishness that you get towards a certain character or trope. There isn’t really an English word for it, though in the fanfiction community I’ve heard the similar-but-different “id-tastic” or “that’s iddy to me”, the idea being that your id resonates with certain universal archetypes, which you will always find appealing when they appear in subtly different forms across books, films, comics, games and television. In the last couple of years, at least…

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The Stories We Tell by Kris Ripper

Let’s chat for a minute about taking storytelling risks. The Queer and the Restless features violence against queer people. I’m a little nervous about this. For a long time the only queer stories that were permitted to be told were stories in which queer folks lived tragic lives, or stories in which queer folks were villains as a result of their innate wrongness. In Queers of La Vista, the majority of the recurring characters are queer. Some are grumpy, some are kind, some are obsessive, some are driven, or sweet,…

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So…what now? by Jenn Burke

In early 2014, I got the news I had been waiting to hear my whole life: I was going to be published. My first novel had been accepted by Entangled Publishing for their Covet imprint. Then, in July 2014, I got even better news: the proposal for a five-book male/male sci-fi romance series my BFF Kelly Jensen and I had submitted to Carina Press was accepted too! To say I was over the moon would be an understatement. Her Sexy Sentinel was published in January 2015. Chaos Station, the first…

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Growing and Cutting by May Peterson

One of the cornerstones of the fiction world is the relationship between authors and editors, symbolizing much about art itself: the balance between inspiration and control, generation and selection. A strong author-editor relationship is a rock solid foundation for the burgeoning of creative genius, artistic refinement, and a career’s worth of books that knock the socks off of millions of readers. Both sides of this equation are important, and many people only fill one role, author or editor. Why this is so seems simple: different people have different strengths, and…

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Good Sex Is Not A Bad Thing by Karen Stivali

A lot of people ask me variations on the same few questions: Why do you write books with sex in them? and Why is romance novel sex always so good—isn’t that unrealistic? I’ve been a romance reader since the days when I was young enough to have to sneak the dirty ones into the house and read them by flashlight after my parents went to bed. As of this month, I’ve been a published romance author for five years. The books I’ve enjoyed reading since I was a preteen all…

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