The Story of the Bad Ugly Monster by May Peterson

Gender in Romance is a series of posts focusing on the various experiences and perspectives of some of the top voices in queer fiction. Read more from the series here.   I learned early that I was bad. This wasn’t taught to me directly, like the ABCs. Of course the adults around me wanted me to be good and to believe I could be good. It wasn’t that I wasn’t loved, or that I didn’t try to behave. It was more like the way I learned that an oven could burn your hand,…

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Nonconforming Gender Expectations by Anna Zabo

I don’t like gender boxes. Maybe it’s because I’m non-binary and personally dislike having to act one way or another, but I don’t think so. I tend to see people as wholes, as totalities. Whatever gender they are, that shouldn’t affect how they act or dress or behave. It can, because we do live in a world where gender is coded by behavior and dress, but it shouldn’t. People are far more complex than anything binary. Pink is for boys and blue is for girls. Or is it the other…

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Men in Romance: Mountaineers in Love by Jeff Mann

Men in Romance is a series of posts focusing on the various experiences and perspectives of men who write romance. Read more from this series here.   I’m both flattered and bemused by the opportunity to write a post for Men in Romance. When I try to imagine a typical romance writer, I envision the hysterically funny Matt Lucas on Little Britain portraying Dame Sally Markham, a character based on Dame Barbara Cartland.  Dame Sally—an obese elderly woman with a silvery hairdo, dressed in pearls and an elegant pink gown—sprawls…

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Men in Romance: Wary of the Uncanny Man by Steve Berman

Men in Romance is a series of posts focusing on the various experiences and perspectives of men who write romance. Read more from this series here. We must remember one of the oldest adages: beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Writers must be obsessive with details, of course. We must hone our imagination as much as we hone our skill with words. And we must hone our eye for details. Yet, too often I happen upon the most un-detailed of men. Where? Not in my bed, not in…

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Men in Romance: M in a W M4M World by Edmond Manning

Men in Romance is a series of posts focusing on the various experiences and perspectives of men who write romance. Read more from this series here. I’ve been avoiding writing this guest blog post for weeks, though almost daily, I’ve been ruminating.  It takes a lot of effort to ruminate. Big Author Word. In some ways, this seems like a no-win topic. Whenever a gay man discusses being a writer in a woman-dominated genre, discussion often intensifies into a “who belongs here” argument. Let’s skip to its resolution: women belong…

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So…what now? by Jenn Burke

In early 2014, I got the news I had been waiting to hear my whole life: I was going to be published. My first novel had been accepted by Entangled Publishing for their Covet imprint. Then, in July 2014, I got even better news: the proposal for a five-book male/male sci-fi romance series my BFF Kelly Jensen and I had submitted to Carina Press was accepted too! To say I was over the moon would be an understatement. Her Sexy Sentinel was published in January 2015. Chaos Station, the first…

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Confronting My Past with Romance by Santino Hassell

One of the most common questions I’m asked as an author is whether I base my books on real events, real people, or real relationships. In the past I’ve said “no except for some obvious themes like writing about teachers”, but now I’m starting to wonder if that’s a complete response. I don’t follow the advice to write what you know, but after some reflection I think what I feel and have experienced has infiltrated my books and my characters. There are trends in my novels that are easy to…

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Elysium by Nora Sakavic

When people ask me what I’m writing these days, it’s generally easiest to just say “Nothing”. It’s the truth—and yet somehow also as far from the truth as possible. Coming out of The King’s Men, the only thing I knew for sure was I didn’t want to work on another trilogy yet. I wanted something shorter, something compact, a standalone I could start and finish and set aside. Finding something suitable, however, has proven to be a monumental challenge. The Foxhole Court was a personal project, and it took seventeen…

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