On Comparisons: Writing Trans Characters in Same-Gender Romance by Austin Chant

Gender in Romance is a series of posts focusing on the various experiences and perspectives of some of the top voices in queer fiction. Read more from the series here. Let me start with an understatement: when you’re trans, it’s hard not to compare yourself to cis people. I’m a queer man; I go through life every day as a dude who likes other dudes. I’m about as excited as a person can be for that Dream Daddy game. But I’ve never quite felt like a “real” queer man, whatever that…

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When Bad Things Happen to Good Characters by Annabeth Albert

There’s a trend right now towards low-angst stories where the greatest hurdle a couple faces is getting out of the way of their own feelings. And these stories are great—I have a number of them on my keeper shelf and sometimes it’s exactly what I’m in the mood to read.  It’s one of the cornerstones of what a romance should be—escapism and good feelings.  After all, real life, especially these days, is hard and uncertain and filled with tense emotions. And we all know all too well that sometimes horrible…

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Dialect in Dialogue by Jude Sierra

When I was writing my third novel, Idlewild, I spent a lot of time pondering (agonizing) over speech patterns in dialogue for my characters. This story takes place in downtown Detroit; in it we have Tyler, a young, genderqueer black man coming out of college and into adulthood who grew up in the city. We also have Asher, a sort-of middle aged (I am struggling to reconcile 33 as middle aged, if only so I can avoid being called so myself, ha!) Jewish man from the suburbs who has become…

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The hottest sparkliest most id-tastic version of the thing by CS Pacat

Recently I’ve been thinking a lot about moe, the Japanese word for the feeling of excitement, love or fannishness that you get towards a certain character or trope. There isn’t really an English word for it, though in the fanfiction community I’ve heard the similar-but-different “id-tastic” or “that’s iddy to me”, the idea being that your id resonates with certain universal archetypes, which you will always find appealing when they appear in subtly different forms across books, films, comics, games and television. In the last couple of years, at least…

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So…what now? by Jenn Burke

In early 2014, I got the news I had been waiting to hear my whole life: I was going to be published. My first novel had been accepted by Entangled Publishing for their Covet imprint. Then, in July 2014, I got even better news: the proposal for a five-book male/male sci-fi romance series my BFF Kelly Jensen and I had submitted to Carina Press was accepted too! To say I was over the moon would be an understatement. Her Sexy Sentinel was published in January 2015. Chaos Station, the first…

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How Do You Write With Kids? by Genevieve Turner

It’s a question that all writers with small kids get: “How do you write with kids?” Since I have three little ones myself and I’ve been writing for six years now (back when I only had one and was pregnant with the second) I get this question a lot. As soon as I admit my kids’ ages (8, 5, and 3), this question pretty much immediately falls from the other person’s mouth, without fail. And then comes my answer, which hasn’t changed much since my third was born: “I don’t…

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Learning to Say No by Elyse Springer

On a quiet Tuesday afternoon in March, I got a phone call from a publisher: they were accepting my novel for publication. It was the first acceptance I’d ever received. Let me tell you what that feels like: Euphoria. It feels like Christmas Day and winning the lottery and being handed your dreams on a silver platter. It’s black text on a white screen that says, “You aren’t just a writer; you’re an author.” It is the best feeling in the entire world. But reality hits pretty quickly. I had…

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